All Their Sisters

Off I fly, careering far
In chase of Pollys, prettier far
Than any of their namesakes are
—The Polymaths and Polyhistors,
Polyglots and all their sisters.

My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.

—Jack Layton (via shychemist)

(Source: wow-suchbree-veryblog, via shychemist)

design-is-fine:

George Haité, design for a Paisley shawl, 1850. Watercolour and gouache.

In the mid-19th century there was a fashion for exotic imported shawls. Weavers in France and Britain tried to exploit this demand by producing their own versions. One major centre of shawl weaving was Paisley in Scotland, where woven and printed versions were produced. Soon there was furious competition between manufacturers. With the aid of the semi-automated Jacquard loom, they were now able to produce much bigger and more elaborate patterns than ever before. George Haité (1825-1871) was a well known and prolific designer of shawl patterns. By 1850 he and his fellow designers were drawing enormous and fantastic all-over patterns based on pine cones. They were of brilliant colour and had large repeats. V&A

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

design-is-fine:

Owen Jones (1809-74), Original drawing for The Grammar of Ornament (Persian No. 1),1856.

design-is-fine:

Owen Jones (1809-74), Original drawing for The Grammar of Ornament (Persian No. 1),1856.

(Source: vam.ac.uk)

design-is-fine:

David Bartle, Furnishing fabric, 1973. Great Britain. Printed cotton. V&A, London.

design-is-fine:

David Bartle, Furnishing fabric, 1973. Great Britain. Printed cotton. V&A, London.

design-is-fine:

The Ratti pitch sheet, 1988. © Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum. Exhibition The Glamour of Italian Fashion, til 27 July 2014, V&A, London.

This sheet of paper, 1.5 m long, is called a pitch sheet – or carta prova in Italian. It is a medium of communication between the textile designer and textile manufacturer. V&A

pippoliniantonio said: after the first look at carta prova the textile designer will (or won’t) give his approvation of the work done

design-is-fine:

The Ratti pitch sheet, 1988. © Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum. Exhibition The Glamour of Italian Fashion, til 27 July 2014, V&A, London.

This sheet of paper, 1.5 m long, is called a pitch sheet – or carta prova in Italian. It is a medium of communication between the textile designer and textile manufacturer. V&A

pippoliniantonio said: after the first look at carta prova the textile designer will (or won’t) give his approvation of the work done

(Source: vam.ac.uk)